I left nothing

!!!!!!!!!!!!

Hay Papi! New Photo Book, “Dominicanos,” Features Men Of The Dominican Republic

bizzybmag:

image

Famed photographer, Ernest Montgomery, has captured some of the most beautiful men of the Dominican Republic in a new photo book, Dominicanos.

“If I could be a destination, I would be the Dominican Republic. It has become my alter ego,” said Ernest Montgomery. His new book, Dominicanos, has created quite a stir, visually.  He has captured something powerful and unique in his pictures. These images do more than exhibit and showcase Dominican male bodies. It gives them a voice. Visibility. And, an opportunity for the world to be invited into their lives, allowing us to imagine, wonder, and consider how beauty is designed. How it is created. Smart-fully crafted. And, above all else, how it shapes itself in refined places defying time and space.

“The Dominican Republic is sexy, seductive, engaging, and temperamental,” said Ernest. “This is where all my dreams are in color.”

- See more at: 

"Serendipity"

Accidental shot and still beautiful!


  "While is was shooting at the milky way, my tripod was not completely safe, my camera moved during the exposure, capturing this lovely star trail." by Sergio Montúfar

"Serendipity"

Accidental shot and still beautiful!

"While is was shooting at the milky way, my tripod was not completely safe, my camera moved during the exposure, capturing this lovely star trail." by Sergio Montúfar

afro-dominicano:

is there a psychological term for the social phenomena when people care more about outside/ international affairs more than they do about the affairs happening right at their doorsteps/ local social affairs be it unrest or communal? just wanna know out of interest

for instance white new yorkers worrying more about “the starving children of Africa” than they do about the black kids getting legally terrorized by the nypd

is there a psychological term for the social phenomena when people care more about outside/ international affairs more than they do about the affairs happening right at their doorsteps/ local social affairs be it unrest or communal? just wanna know out of interest

beautifulmars:

Intersection of Dark-Capped Ridges and Dark-Capped Plains

beautifulmars:

Intersection of Dark-Capped Ridges and Dark-Capped Plains

"Discrimination isn’t a thunderbolt, it isn’t an abrupt slap in the face. It’s the slow drumbeat of being underappreciated, feeling uncomfortable and encountering roadblocks along the path to success."

Astrophysicist Meg Urry, quoted in "Girls Love Science. We Tell Them Not To." (via almost-a-class-act)
centralparknyc:

A new report (detailed here) from Columbia University details how climate change may effect Central Park. The report says rising temperatures will be hard on our trees—especially the young and old—and on the organisms (both animal and vegetal) that live in our man made bodies of water, and it may make caring for our famous lawns ever more challenging.
But, there is an upside. Central Park is actually a useful tool in mitigating the effects of climate change. As long as we, the Central Park Conservancy, continue to support the Park’s biodiversity and keep our ecosystem healthy (a task we are deeply committed to), then the Park will continue to “increase its resilience to climate change, and make it a suitable habitat for more plants and animals.”
(via Studying climate change in Central Park | New York)

centralparknyc:

A new report (detailed here) from Columbia University details how climate change may effect Central Park. The report says rising temperatures will be hard on our trees—especially the young and old—and on the organisms (both animal and vegetal) that live in our man made bodies of water, and it may make caring for our famous lawns ever more challenging.

But, there is an upside. Central Park is actually a useful tool in mitigating the effects of climate change. As long as we, the Central Park Conservancy, continue to support the Park’s biodiversity and keep our ecosystem healthy (a task we are deeply committed to), then the Park will continue to “increase its resilience to climate change, and make it a suitable habitat for more plants and animals.”

(via Studying climate change in Central Park | New York)

themorningnews:

If it all plays out as expected and budgeted, astronomers of the 2020s will be swimming in petabytes of data streaming from space and the ground. Herewith a report card on the future of big-time stargazing.
More Eyes on the Skies

themorningnews:

If it all plays out as expected and budgeted, astronomers of the 2020s will be swimming in petabytes of data streaming from space and the ground. Herewith a report card on the future of big-time stargazing.

More Eyes on the Skies

christinetheastrophysicist:

Planck’s New Dust Model
Title: Planck 2013 results. XI. All-sky model of thermal dust emission
Authors: The Planck Collaboration
Planck’s latest all-sky survey presents a model of the thermal dust emission. This new model provides an estimate of the temperature of dust throughout the sky and an improved estimate of the dust opacity.
The technical paper has a lot of interesting analyses and can be found here.
Image: A map of the dust optical depth. The Galactic center is towards the center of the map.

christinetheastrophysicist:

Planck’s New Dust Model

Planck’s latest all-sky survey presents a model of the thermal dust emission. This new model provides an estimate of the temperature of dust throughout the sky and an improved estimate of the dust opacity.

The technical paper has a lot of interesting analyses and can be found here.

Image: A map of the dust optical depth. The Galactic center is towards the center of the map.

wildcat2030:

Cognitive celebrity -Albert Einstein was a genius, but he wasn’t the only one – why has his name come to mean something superhuman? - Before he died, Albert Einstein requested that his whole body be cremated as soon as possible after death, and his ashes scattered in an undisclosed location. He didn’t want his mortal remains to be turned into a shrine, but his request was only partially heeded. Einstein’s closest friend, the economist Otto Nathan, took possession of his ashes, but not before Thomas Harvey, the pathologist who performed the autopsy, removed his brain. Family and friends were aghast, but Harvey convinced Einstein’s son Hans Albert to give his reluctant permission after the fact. The eccentric doctor kept the brain in a glass jar of formalin inside a cider box under a cooler, until 1998, when he returned it to Princeton Hospital, and from time to time, he would send little chunks of it to interested scientists. Most of us will never be victims of brain-theft and ash hoarding, but Einstein’s status as the archetypical genius of modern times singled him out for special treatment. An ordinary person can live and die privately, but a genius – and his grey matter – belongs to the world. Even in his lifetime, which coincided with the first great flowering of mass media, Einstein was a celebrity, as famous for his wit and white shock of hair as he was for his science. Indeed, his life seems to have been timed perfectly to take advantage of the proliferations of newspapers and radio shows, whose reports often framed Einstein’s theories as being incomprehensible to anyone but the genius himself. There’s no doubt that Einstein’s contributions to science were revolutionary. Before he came along, cosmology was a part of philosophy but, thanks to him, it’s become a branch of science, tasked with no less than a mathematical history and evolution of the Universe. Einstein’s work also led to the discovery of exotic physical phenomena such as black holes, gravitational waves, quantum entanglement, the Big Bang, and the Higgs boson. But despite this formidable scientific legacy, Einstein’s fame owes something more to our culture’s obsession with celebrity. In many ways, Einstein was well-suited for celebrity. Apart from his distinctive coif, he had a way with words and, as a result, he is frequently quoted, occasionally with bon mots he didn’t actually say. More than anything, Einstein possessed the distinctive mystique of genius, a sense that he was larger than life, or different from the rest of us in some fundamental way, which is why so many people were desperate to get hold of his brain. (via Why is Einstein the poster boy for genius? – Matthew Francis – Aeon)

wildcat2030:

Cognitive celebrity
-
Albert Einstein was a genius, but he wasn’t the only one – why has his name come to mean something superhuman?
-
Before he died, Albert Einstein requested that his whole body be cremated as soon as possible after death, and his ashes scattered in an undisclosed location. He didn’t want his mortal remains to be turned into a shrine, but his request was only partially heeded. Einstein’s closest friend, the economist Otto Nathan, took possession of his ashes, but not before Thomas Harvey, the pathologist who performed the autopsy, removed his brain. Family and friends were aghast, but Harvey convinced Einstein’s son Hans Albert to give his reluctant permission after the fact. The eccentric doctor kept the brain in a glass jar of formalin inside a cider box under a cooler, until 1998, when he returned it to Princeton Hospital, and from time to time, he would send little chunks of it to interested scientists. Most of us will never be victims of brain-theft and ash hoarding, but Einstein’s status as the archetypical genius of modern times singled him out for special treatment. An ordinary person can live and die privately, but a genius – and his grey matter – belongs to the world. Even in his lifetime, which coincided with the first great flowering of mass media, Einstein was a celebrity, as famous for his wit and white shock of hair as he was for his science. Indeed, his life seems to have been timed perfectly to take advantage of the proliferations of newspapers and radio shows, whose reports often framed Einstein’s theories as being incomprehensible to anyone but the genius himself.
There’s no doubt that Einstein’s contributions to science were revolutionary. Before he came along, cosmology was a part of philosophy but, thanks to him, it’s become a branch of science, tasked with no less than a mathematical history and evolution of the Universe. Einstein’s work also led to the discovery of exotic physical phenomena such as black holes, gravitational waves, quantum entanglement, the Big Bang, and the Higgs boson. But despite this formidable scientific legacy, Einstein’s fame owes something more to our culture’s obsession with celebrity. In many ways, Einstein was well-suited for celebrity. Apart from his distinctive coif, he had a way with words and, as a result, he is frequently quoted, occasionally with bon mots he didn’t actually say. More than anything, Einstein possessed the distinctive mystique of genius, a sense that he was larger than life, or different from the rest of us in some fundamental way, which is why so many people were desperate to get hold of his brain. (via Why is Einstein the poster boy for genius? – Matthew Francis – Aeon)

historiascienciacionales:

¡Mueve esos brazos mientras corres!
Aquellos que lo han hecho con los brazos pegados al cuerpo podrán estar de acuerdo en que es complicado y cansado. Más aún si lo hacen con los brazos cruzados sobre el pecho, y ya no digamos con las manos tomadas por arriba de la cabeza.
Cuando movemos las piernas al correr, de manera casi instintiva, movemos los brazos. Al hacer esto con nuestras extremidades superiores, se logra un balance con nuestras piernas y pies. 
Aunque la física de la carrera se tiene clara, poco se entendía el costo energético de mover los brazos durante esta actividad.
Dos investigadores de universidades estadounidenses sugirieron que correr sin mover los brazos demanda más energía que correr con los brazos en movimiento. Para poner a prueba esta idea, le pidieron a un grupo de trece personas que corren de manera regular, que lo hicieran en el laboratorio en diferentes posturas.
Después de medir por siete minutos el consumo de oxígeno y la producción de dióxido de carbono de las personas mientras se movían sobre una banda para correr, los investigadores les pidieron que colocaran por unos minutos sus brazos junto a su cuerpo y las manos detrás de su espalda, luego que los cruzaran sobre su pecho, para finalizar tomando sus manos sobe la cabeza.  Cabe mencionar que al finalizar la sesión, los corredores se quejaron por los brazos cansados, sobre todo por la última posición.
Los investigadores compararon los resultados obtenidos de correr con los brazos en movimiento contra las otras tres posiciones. Los brazos junto al cuerpo y las manos detrás de la espalda aumenta un 3% el consumo de energía, 9% más si se cruzan en el pecho, y 13% más si se ponen sobre la cabeza.
Finalmente, analizaron el movimiento de los hombros de los corredores. Esto sirvió para concluir que el balanceo de nuestro torso y extremidades superiores cuando corremos es lo que define el consumo de energía. Es decir que mover los brazos reduce la energía, ayuda a minimizar el movimiento de la parte superior mientras se corre, y facilita alcanzar la estabilidad.
Este trabajo es un argumento de la importancia de mover los brazos cuando se corre. Ahora, sabemos que la fórmula para ser un corredor disciplinado involucra muchas más cosas que sólo moverse. Clive Staples Lewis, creador del mundo de Narnia, decía que si uno pudiera correr sin cansarse, entonces uno no querría hacer nada más. Así que ¡a calentar ese cuerpo para salir a correr!
————————————————————
[Imagen tomada de este sitio]
Artículo original
Nota de The Journal of Experimental Biology

historiascienciacionales:

¡Mueve esos brazos mientras corres!

Aquellos que lo han hecho con los brazos pegados al cuerpo podrán estar de acuerdo en que es complicado y cansado. Más aún si lo hacen con los brazos cruzados sobre el pecho, y ya no digamos con las manos tomadas por arriba de la cabeza.

Cuando movemos las piernas al correr, de manera casi instintiva, movemos los brazos. Al hacer esto con nuestras extremidades superiores, se logra un balance con nuestras piernas y pies. 

Aunque la física de la carrera se tiene clara, poco se entendía el costo energético de mover los brazos durante esta actividad.

Dos investigadores de universidades estadounidenses sugirieron que correr sin mover los brazos demanda más energía que correr con los brazos en movimiento. Para poner a prueba esta idea, le pidieron a un grupo de trece personas que corren de manera regular, que lo hicieran en el laboratorio en diferentes posturas.

Después de medir por siete minutos el consumo de oxígeno y la producción de dióxido de carbono de las personas mientras se movían sobre una banda para correr, los investigadores les pidieron que colocaran por unos minutos sus brazos junto a su cuerpo y las manos detrás de su espalda, luego que los cruzaran sobre su pecho, para finalizar tomando sus manos sobe la cabeza.  Cabe mencionar que al finalizar la sesión, los corredores se quejaron por los brazos cansados, sobre todo por la última posición.

Los investigadores compararon los resultados obtenidos de correr con los brazos en movimiento contra las otras tres posiciones. Los brazos junto al cuerpo y las manos detrás de la espalda aumenta un 3% el consumo de energía, 9% más si se cruzan en el pecho, y 13% más si se ponen sobre la cabeza.

Finalmente, analizaron el movimiento de los hombros de los corredores. Esto sirvió para concluir que el balanceo de nuestro torso y extremidades superiores cuando corremos es lo que define el consumo de energía. Es decir que mover los brazos reduce la energía, ayuda a minimizar el movimiento de la parte superior mientras se corre, y facilita alcanzar la estabilidad.

Este trabajo es un argumento de la importancia de mover los brazos cuando se corre. Ahora, sabemos que la fórmula para ser un corredor disciplinado involucra muchas más cosas que sólo moverse. Clive Staples Lewis, creador del mundo de Narnia, decía que si uno pudiera correr sin cansarse, entonces uno no querría hacer nada más. Así que ¡a calentar ese cuerpo para salir a correr!

————————————————————

[Imagen tomada de este sitio]

Artículo original

Nota de The Journal of Experimental Biology